The social motivator icon.

Understanding Motivators: Social

Desire to help others or solve society's problems.

People who have a High Social motivator want to find ways to give back to their community. If they understand how their education will help them help others, they become much more engaged in academics. If you are a High Social, it’s important for you to figure out where you want to give back (work with people, volunteer, join a community advisory council) and how you can make a difference in that area.

Passionate Socials’ core question in life is typically, “What is my cause?” It’s totally OK if you don’t know your cause yet. Just start helping people and working with organizations that are solving social problems you are interested in. Resonant social causes are also typically in areas where you might have experienced personal pain. Don’t be afraid to heal yourself, then go back to help heal others in the same situation.

Reflection Questions: High Social

If Social is one of your top two motivators, consider the questions below.  Remember, the higher your score is, the more you may feel passionate about that motivator. If you have a very high score, think about how it might stand out in your life and how you can use your passion in practical ways. The lower your score is, the more negative you probably feel about that motivator.

    • What is your cause?
    • To what issue do you want to give your time?
    • What injustice makes you angry?
    • What problem do you want to solve in the world?
    • How do you want to make a difference?
    • How can you use your education to gain the skills to make a difference in the world?
    • Motivators can help you know what you want most out of your career and future plans. Do your future plans align with your top motivators?

For more information about the Indigo Assessment, visit https://www.indigoeducationcompany.com/indigo-assessment/

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All the motivator icons.

Understanding Indigo: Motivators

The Indigo Assessment measures 6 motivators as described in the work of Drs. Eduard Spranger and Gordon Allport in their study of human value, motivation and drive. Motivators describe why people do things: the internal desires that drive behavior. For example, the Aesthetic motivator indicates a desire for harmony and beauty, whereas the Theoretical motivator describes those who learn for the sake of knowledge. Motivators correlate with career choice, college major selection, and fulfilling activities.

The Indigo Assessment measures six motivators:

Aesthetic – Desire for form, harmony, balance, or beauty.
Individualistic – Desire for independence, visibility, rank, or power.
Social – Desire to help others or solve society’s problems.
Theoretical – Desire to learn for the sake of knowledge.
Traditional – Desire to live by a personal set of principles, standards, or beliefs.
Utilitarian – Desire for a return on investment of time, energy, or money.

What Motivates You?

The motivator list ranks your relative passion for each of the six motivators. Your motivators are ranked in order from the most important to the least important to you, with the 1st being the motivator with your highest score and the 6th being the motivator with your lowest score. Your motivator score for each motivator is given to the right of each bar.

Look at your ranking first (ranking is the order in which the motivators appear). Whether the numerical score is very high or around average, the top two motivators are the most important. If the third motivator is high, it is generally worth thinking about as well.

A sample motivator graph for a High Social motivator.

Notice where your score is close to 0 or 100. This reveals areas where your motivators may be outside the mainstream and could lead to passion or conflict.

The further a score rises above mainstream, the more you may feel passionate about that motivator. If you have passionate scores, think about how they might stand out in your life and how you can use your passion in practical ways.

The lower your score is, the more negative you probably feel about that motivator. Essentially, this is a “de-motivator”. What turns you “off” is just as valuable to notice as what gets you jazzed. It can sometimes explain why certain people are resistant to different activities or can’t get along with people who have an opposite motivator.

For more information about the Indigo Assessment, visit https://www.indigoeducationcompany.com/indigo-assessment/

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